The Antihero

I read a statistic once saying that the popularity of a show like The Walking Dead could be correlated to economic dissatisfaction across society.  People like to see a representation of darkness and characters finding a way to survive. They love an escape and an outside enemy that will not stay dead is a perfect example of anxiety personified.

I went to see Suicide Squad the weekend it opened in theaters. The movie, one of the many made from the DC Comics universe, is based on a gang of villains recruited to stop an evil entity attacking the city.

The movie wasn’t the best.  If you are able to not think enough to ignore some horrible writing and acting, settling for action and special effects, you’d be happy. There’s a scene in a bar where the gang is debating whether to keep going with their mission.  One of the characters, with the ability to start fires, talks about burning his house down and killing his wife and children in the process.

Margo Robbie, playing Harley Quinn, tells him to own it.  She states that “normal is only a setting on the dryer.” Jared Leto, in the best performance of the movie, puts his spin on the Joker.

He asks Robbie’s character if she will die for him.  She says yes.  He thinks for a moment and tells her that is too easy.  He then asks if she will live for him.

The time frame for life is much longer than stepping into the void by following a cause.

This is the appeal of the antihero and we love our antiheroes.

pexels-photo

A trending Facebook headline tonight read that Amazon is releasing a documentary on Hugh Heffner. I scrolled through some responses and enjoyed the critics. You’d think Heff destroyed generations of the American family (maybe he did).

A rally for Donald Trump today, in Fairfield, Connecticut, drew almost 5,000 people. Just to let you in on the significance of that, Connecticut isn’t exactly a traditional bastion of Republican ideals.

We love our antiheroes. They give voice to things we don’t feel like we can access.  The bar of morality has vanished. Racism, sexism, violence, hatred, exploitation, whatever flavor you’d like.

They get ugly as we stand to the side and watch.

Suicide Squad is next in line chronologically from Batman vs. Superman.  Besides being another epic of horrible writing, the movie examines the relationship between power and responsibility.

Superman may save the world, but his collateral damage doesn’t just go away. Batman, honestly played well by a brooding Ben Affleck, dreams of the death of his parents and his inability to protect Gotham from Superman.

Regardless of our stance, we can’t stay neutral.  There is no still. We are riding our bikes up hill, either moving forward or drifting back.

As parents, we must take an accurate compass of society and be sure to communicate with our kids. We can help them know that everyone has a responsibility. They have a responsibility to you and their friends to be there and make a positive difference.

As those of us who claim to follow Jesus, we must never forget the message of love and peace. We know that God never gives up on us, never stops caring. We may feel the guilt of being unable to protect those we love from the dark side of life.  We may feel weak in the storm of audio and visual noise.

Antiheroes are flawed, even if they do not know it.

Being flawed is a constant reminder of grace.  If you are reading this and taking a breath, grace is alive and present in your life. Be thankful as you start a new week for the good thing to come and the positive changes in your future.

 

 

Advertisements

Help Yourself

Shopping on Amazon is almost too easy. In a few clicks you can find whatever book, movie, tech product, or toy you want. You’ll find recommendations and different price levels. Take the app to any retail store and you can scan items to see their immediate price on the website.

One of my favorite features is reading customer reviews.  Now, not all are honest. Sellers will pay people for reviews.  Even with this understanding, you’ll often find some interesting observations and consistencies.

Today I was reading a review of Pastor Steven Furtick’s book, (Un)Qualified. The guy wrote that the book was merely a combination of Furtick’s podcasts and reformatted stories from his prior publications.

His final line was this, “Do Christians really need another self-help book anyway?”

pexels-photo-70120

Today was Opening Day for Carter’s baseball team.  I stood with the kids talking to another coach.  He is also the field commissioner for the league and spends a ton of time keeping them in shape.

As we watched, kids and parents crossed around us, all sinking deep into the dirt infield, now mud, created from a wet Saturday. He looked at me and said, “I wish I could say something.  I’m going to have to fix all this.”

Do we need another self-help book?

It depends on how you see your faith. At this point in life, I’m a work in progress.  Our family is a work in progress and I know Val and I have a ton of growing to do as a couple and parents. Personally, I find value in the work of speakers and writers holding up the mirror to life, telling me how to avoid sinking into the mud and how to climb my way out.

There is still a mystery of faith.

There are still many why’s waiting for answers.

There are still days I wake up wondering how much longer until the tide turns and the trajectory of life shifts.

So I guess maybe some people who follow Jesus feel they don’t need any more self-help books. Their lives are fine and they are secure. Someday I’ll join that club, even if it is day I do it in heaven.

Until then, let the work commence.  Tomorrow is a fresh start for different and better things.

~Matt

Set It Free

We all have stories.

There is a voice inside straining to get out.  We find ways to do it in a variety of forms.  Artists create written and concrete expressions. Teachers engage and light up their classrooms. Business leaders create the next great product and change society.  In 2015, there are still new things waiting to be found.

So why do we hold on to the old ways?

snowflake(1)

I remember going through English class in elementary school, Lit class in college, and graduate writing courses.  You start with rules, expand your horizons, and finally realize that the great ones break the norms whenever possible.

It creates an interesting dynamic.

Writers tend to eat their own. We play lethal comparison games. We brag. We look at younger writers and tell them to do it our way or else find yourself working the menial jobs while half-novels sit crowding up your hard drive.

Amazon allows anyone to publish a book, in digital or hardcover forms, for free. Do some searching on Amazon and writing and you’ll find a litany of protests from established authors: Don’t do it, they say. Go our route. Play the roulette game of submitting to agents and maybe you’ll get lucky.

Just don’t cut into our profits.

It is time to set our work free.

Consider this your permission. Forget the old way. There are numerous resources for self and indie publishing. You can do the work to build your audience. You can publish. You can get royalty rates much higher than anything a commercial publishing house could provide.

You can write, publish, and get paid for it.

As I sit here tonight, I wonder.  How many best sellers are sitting on computers right now? How many novels have made the rejection rounds to end up in the physical or digital recycle bin?

As Pressfield asks in The War of Art:

Which is the bigger fear, that we may fail or that, one day, we will succeed beyond our wildest dreams?

~Matt

As a reminder, you can get my e-book: Your First Step for FREE at the following link:

Just Click Here

Check it out and share with anyone needing some hope in their life.